Rising 2L and Mayo Clinic visit.

“Lord, let me make a difference for you that is utterly disproportionate to who I am.” David Brainerd

After receiving my grades the last couple weeks, I can safely say I survived my first year of law school, and I am a rising 2L. Not having surgery mid-semester in the spring (as I did in the fall) reflected positively on my grades, and I did noticeably better. I wasn’t sure if I was really cut out for this law school thing, but with minimal medical interruptions this spring, my hard-work actually showed some fruit in the end.

In addition, I did my first oral argument this spring. Unlike many of my classmates who thrive in the idea of speaking and arguing in the courtroom, the practice is not something I enjoy (believe it or not, there are lawyers who don’t spend their careers in the courtroom ;)). However, my argument, in front of a panel of lawyers I had never met, turned out to be…fun? I never thought I would do anything like that in my life, and I truly felt like I overcame a great obstacle when I finished.

Mayo Clinic

At the end of May, I traveled to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, because my doctors in Chicago suggested I try some alternative thyroid cancer treatment before going in for another surgery. I flew up there for what was supposed to be about a three day procedure: I’d have a bunch of tests run on the first day and meet with the doctors to create a plan, and then the next two days would be the treatment.

My parents flew in from San Francisco, and the first day we were in the clinic from 6 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. I had a bunch of blood work done and scans. After several meetings throughout the afternoon with various doctors, I learned I was not a candidate for the alternative treatment after all. I must say, I didn’t think this was even a possibility.

They showed me my imaging, and there was more cancer present than they expected to see. The suspicious spots were too close together for the treatment to be safe. At the end of the day, I learned I would have yet another surgery. This time, I will go to Mayo for the surgery, making this my fourth surgery, fourth hospital, and fourth surgeon in 2 years.

Yet again, the new surgeon made a point of telling me that with the amount of surgeries I’ve had and the location of the masses, I need to be prepared for permanent vocal damage. Of course, this is not easy news to stomach. I’ve had the warnings before each surgery, and seem to defy the odds, but as I have more and more surgeries, the odds will probably not be in my favor. I’ll have to summon my inner Katniss Everdeen and hope for the best.

I find myself singing more freely these days, and praying harder than ever for my voice remain unharmed. Unless, of course, I end up with a raspy blues or Nora Jones voice. THEN, color me blessed.

They told me I could schedule my surgery within a couple weeks of my visit, but I decided to wait. I have one week between summer and fall classes, and I plan on making the trip then. In my opinion, if more grows or becomes visible–great–they can get it all out at that time. Without my body responding to radiation, the only option is for masses visible to the eye to be removed in surgery, so waiting for masses to become visible sounds fine to me. My fourth surgery will be August 12, 2014.

Summer 2014

This summer, I am a full-time legal intern for Equip for Equality. I had such a positive experience working there this spring, and I couldn’t be more pleased to come on full-time for the summer. I’ve been able to do a lot of research lately, and I am learning more than I could have hoped for. I am also taking Evidence with a bunch of my friends. It reminds me of taking Criminal Law last summer, which was probably the best summer of my life.

Thank you

Thank you for all who continue to read and support me on this long journey. I can’t thank you enough for reaching out to me and lending your thoughts and prayers. I often find myself numb to the scans, blood work, meetings, surgeries, etc. It’s so routine these days, that I often forget to rest in the weight of what I’m going through physically, emotionally, intellectually…

The longer I go without writing on here, the more I feel like I’m missing out on an opportunity to truly find myself and become a stronger, healthy woman. Thank you all for challenging me to put my pride aside, and sometimes recognize that this can be tough, it can be frustrating, and it can be completely exhausting. Someday I’ll be able to close this chapter of my life, and move on. Until then, I rest in Jesus’ promise to be present through it all.

Mayo Clinic preparation–approaching the end of 1L year

I spoke with an assistant at Mayo Clinic today regarding my alternative treatment for thyroid cancer. The treatment is called ethanol ablation, and you can read my brief explanation in my last blog here. It’s been another month of running around the hospital systems in Chicago, gathering my various pathology slides, imaging CDs, reports, etc., to send to Mayo for review.

Right now it appears my treatment will be two days back-to-back at the end of May (28-29), and I am so thankful that this will be after finals! They plan on doing the treatment, but I found out today the doctor I was referred to is not the one administering the treatment, but instead a resident doctor. Little surprises like this make it difficult to prepare and know what I’m getting myself into. 

Another hiccup in this process is that the hospital with my team of doctors will stop accepting my insurance in three weeks. It has taken two years to feel as though I have a team who has my back and knows me. Thankfully Mayo takes my insurance, and my surgeries are at another hospital that accepts my insurance, but my endocrinologist and the team that regulates my medication and treatment plan is now out of the scope of my insurance, and this is very difficult for me to stomach. Please pray for some direction with this.

Law school has been the most challenging experience of my life–emotionally, physically, intellectually–and there have been many days I just don’t want to be there, many days where I feel like I don’t belong. At the same time, however, I am so sure this is where I am supposed to be. Thank God for my internship this semester, and the incredibly gratifying work I’ve experienced at Equip for Equality through advocating for those with disabilities and their right to be free from abuse and neglect. Without this, I don’t know if I would see any light at the end of the tunnel.

There is one month of this semester left, and I can say I survived 1L year of law school, despite surgery in the middle of the first semester, biopsies every couples months, ultrasounds, body scans, PET scans, blood work, and immeasurable exhaustion. One month until I can say I made it. Thank God.

Easter is this weekend, and I can’t wait. Jesus is the reason I have hope.

Your love it beckons deeply, 
A call to come and die.
By grace now I will come 
And take this life, take your life.

Sin has lost it’s power,
Death has lost it’s sting.
From the grave you’ve risen
Victoriously!

 

Barrister's Ball (law school prom)

Barrister’s Ball (law school prom)

Sex Trafficking – LAS Leads Collaborative Fight Against Modern-Day Slavery

Today Catherine Longkumer spoke on a panel at Chicago-Kent regarding her efforts in combatting human trafficking. I stumbled upon this post that she wrote last year. Please take a moment to read:

I have recently been reflecting on a speech that Kevin Bales made at a TED conference where he talks about how when we free slaves today we want to make sure they experience true liberation and not botched emancipation.

I was thinking about that line as I viewed the movie “Lincoln.” As I watched the legislative process and the strength, resolve and political finesse Lincoln was portrayed to possess, I wondered what it might have been like had he lived. Would the Emancipation have been different if Lincoln had been alive to usher in Reconstruction? Would individuals who had been freed been provided with the support and tools they needed for true liberation? I’m not sure.

As I watched the 112th Congress over the last two years I wonder if we are even still capable of having great defining moments such as the passage of the 13th Amendment…

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New, alternative treatment

Hello, friends.

I just wanted to post a quick update about my recent test results. Unfortunately, my levels increased again, and suspicious nodes appeared on the scans. I will have another PET scan this week and biopsies during springs break.

However, since I am resistant to radiation and have had three surgeries in the last 1.5 years, I am excited to say my doctor wants me to try a new, alternative treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota before diving into another surgery.

The treatment is an “ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation,” and you can read a brief synopsis of it here. Simply, they shoot alcohol directly into the nodes. There are some qualifications–the growths have to be easily accessible through needle and can’t be near any major arteries/vessels–so we have to make sure that they can easily access the spots in order to qualify. Still, I am very excited that my doctors are willing to start thinking outside the box.

Law school is keeping me busy. I continue to struggle with fatigue and focus, but I’m pushing through and enjoying the ride. Spring break is in just over a week and I cannot wait to head to Nashville with Andrew, and to warm up a bit while enjoying a lot of music. YES!

In other news, here’s a cute photo of my nephew from his visit last weekend 😉 :

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Reflecting on Comparison

I have been absent from the regular blogging scene for most of my first year of law school, but recent events have pushed me to take a moment to write something other than an appellate brief (or to continue the property reading I should be doing 🙂 ). 

Last weekend at Soul City, we talked about comparison, and the negative impact it has on our lives. I wanted to take a moment to note the extent comparison has affected me within the last couple years. Comparison is such an ingrained part of our society, and often it is so natural that we can be bound by its fruits without even realizing it.

Pride or Insecurity

One of the focuses this weekend was that comparison has one of two results: pride (when we view ourselves above someone else), or insecurity (when we feel we don’t measure up to what we believe we should be in relations to others).

Recognizing this distinction is humbling. Until starting law school, I admit I struggled more with pride in many of my passions: music, writing, schooling, etc. Now, however, the tables have turned, and this is yet again humbling.

Law School: breeding comparison

Law school is notoriously competitive, and such an environment breeds comparison on every level. While some of this competition is self-induced—-trying to be the top of the class—-the structure of the first year law school requires comparison, especially with the infamous “curve” grading system. In this system, professors are allotted a few different curves to choose from, but each curve limits the amount of A’s, A-‘s, B+’s, etc. they are allowed to award. In addition, most first year law school classes are entirely determined by a single test at the end of the semester. Because of this, no matter how well you do on your one exam, your entire success is determined by whether or not you do better than someone else.

I have not adjusted well to such a theory and the forced comparison is toxic. I have been a relatively confident person in my young-adult life. However, this environment of ideas and concepts that are completely foreign to my creative/journalistic/reflective psyche, has caused severe insecurity some days and an unhealthy obsessive tendency to compare.

I have spent my years since Princeton, while at law school and in my various professional jobs, not feeling completely a part of the worlds I inhabit. I am always looking over my shoulder wondering if I measure up. Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court Justice

I am thankful that I am interning this semester at an organization I believe in. Each day, I feel like I am able to contribute in a meaningful way, and I feel respected and challenged each day. It is encouraging to know that such an environment exists in the legal world.

Pre-thyroid cancer

What I realized in this discussion is that I have not only been comparing myself to those around me, but I have been obsessively comparing myself to…myself. Since my first surgery for thyroid cancer, when I said goodbye to my thyroid, I have become obsessed with trying to get back to how healthy/fit/focused I was able to be prior to all my surgeries and treatment.

When I look at myself in the mirror, I always remember what I used to look like. I remember how much easier it was to stay fit, how much slimmer my jaw line was prior to my second/third surgeries, and how my face shape used to be less-round when I had still had a thyroid. This obsession is also toxic, especially since many of these issues are not “fixable.”

It is hard to tell yourself that there are things out of your control—-things that no matter how hard you try, you cannot change. I am so thankful for the preservation of my life and my voice in my journey with thyroid cancer. I do not wish to downplay this at all. However, it does take setting some pride aside to admit that these permanent life-changes, many that only I would see in myself, have caused me to look at myself as something less than I could be—-as opposed to different. This kind of comparison has been the most difficult to admit, the most difficult to let go, and the most damaging to my confidence.

Tomorrow I go in for another round of scans to see if I am clear or if another surgery is in my future (since I am resistant to radiation treatment). Each time I’ve gone in for these tests, I have walked out knowing it wasn’t over, and each time I’ve had treatment or surgery again. I will receive tomorrow’s results next Tuesday.

Comparison is a burden we all carry in one sense or another: many of us err on the side of pride, others on the side of insecurity. My prayer is that we take time to examine ourselves and own up to our tendencies and work on freeing ourselves from these burdens.

2013 in Rewind

This has been the longest hiatus from writing on my blog in years–but that’s a true testament to law school I guess–no time for anything else. 🙂 I haven’t written since before my last thyroid cancer surgery, and since then it’s been a crazy few months.

I should take a moment to say my third surgery, though the most difficult, went incredibly smoothly. I managed to only miss 2.5 days of school! (Maybe should’ve taken longer 😉 ) All of my other surgeries put me out for weeks, so this was a miracle.  (Most of) my professors were incredibly supportive this semester, and my classmates were above and beyond what I could have asked for. I am blessed. In any event, I always like to take the time to sit down at the end of the year and reflect on some of the most memorable events of the year.

JANUARY

-2- My nephew Oliver was born on my birthday.

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-9- After having to defer a year for surgeries/cancer treatment, I was received my new acceptance from Chicago-Kent.

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-25-28- I traveled to MINNEAPOLIS and spent time with my Venture Expeditions family and my old Bluecoats friend Andrea Richards.

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Andrea and I in Minneapolis.

FEBRUARY

-22-24- I went to The Justice Conference with Venture Expeditions.

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MARCH

-13-22- I went to Rome and Florence, Italy with my Dad.

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-22- I received a box of nearly 50 letters from my dear RCC drumline friends, wishing me the best of luck in my thyroid cancer journey.

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-27- I got my marimba. After playing for 11 years, I purchased my first marimba.

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APRIL

-3-4- I attended the admitted students weekend for my new class, and met these wonderful ladies!

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-26-Thyroid Cancer surgery #2 (second surgeon)

MAY

-8- I started babysitting my girls.

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-26- I STARTED LAW SCHOOL!

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JUNE

-23- I met the 4k for Cancer folks, who presented me with a scholarship because of my fight with cancer.

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JULY 

-1- I got my second tattoo, illustrating my thyroid cancer journey.

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-19- I went to Pitchfork Music Festival with Andrew.

Click to watch us dance.

Click to watch us dance.

AUGUST

-14-15-Andrew and I went to Door County with his parents. It was one of the most relaxing, special trips I’ve had in a very long time.

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SEPTEMBER

-19- I went to my first Blackhawks game.

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OCTOBER

-19- A group of my friends from school went karaoke-ing with me, because there was a high risk my voice would be damaged in my surgery at the end of October.

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-24- I had my third thyroid cancer surgery (third surgeon).

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-31- Costumes and Kegs halloween party at school. Andrew and I were Little Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf.

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NOVEMBER

-14- I participated in the Kent Justice Foundation wine event–bottles of wine were donated by professors and all proceeds went toward scholarships for students to work in public interest over the summer.

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-22-Andrew and I celebrated 6 months with wine and cheese at Bar Pastoral.

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DECEMBER

-9- Andrew and I went to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

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10-  With your help, I raised $1965 for International Justice Mission.

-20- Finished first semester of law school

-28- Began personal training!